A luxury vessel is washed ashore after typhoon Mangkhut. Photo: Facebook, Billyoutdoor

Typhoon Mangkhut caused widespread devastation in Hong Kong on Sunday and the impact on boats and trees was significant – with many vessels sunk or washed away and 14,800 trees felled across the city.

In Sai Kung, at least 124 boats in various size, including luxury vessels worth at least HK$10 million (US$1.27 million) each, fishing boats and sampans were sunk, overturned and washed ashore, Apple Daily reported.

A large dive boat was seen wrecked on the waterfront while another luxury vessel worth HK$50 million washed ashore on rocks off Sai Kung Pier, Sing Tao Daily reported.

An aerial video clip posted on Facebook by “Billy Outdoor” showed how the devastation Mangkhut created in Sai Kung.

When the weather bureau announced a No. 10 typhoon alert on Sunday, the highest level possible, Sai Kung endured 181km/h winds while waves as high as five meters swamped areas along the coast.

Meanwhile, the government said officials received 14,799 reports of fallen trees as of Tuesday, two days after the typhoon, Hong Kong Economic Journal reported.

There were at least six cases of falling trees hitting buses. One case involved a male passenger who was injured and sent to a hospital.

Meanwhile, around 500 broken windows reported.

Hong Kong and Kowloon Life Guards Union posted a video on Facebook showing broken glass which was found in public swimming pools, including some in Yuen Long, Tin Shui Wai, Tuen Mun in the New Territories, Tung Chung on Lantau Island, Hung Hom and Diamond Hill in Kowloon.

China Light and Power Ltd said at least 1,500 households, mainly in rural areas in the Northern New Territories were still without power. And a further 200 homes on outlying islands like Ap Chau and Crooked Island could have to wait even longer till power is restored.

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