Kuwait. Photo: Wikimedia Commons, Maryam

Even after hearing horror stories like the body of a maid being found in a freezer in Kuwait, many Filipinos are still willing to risk abuse and go to work overseas, driven by the need to provide for their families back home – especially their children.

One domestic worker named Marissa Dalot, 40, who left Kuwait after working there for five years, said she was beaten by her employer’s mother regularly but still chose to stay, Gulf News reported.

“I wanted to continue working because my kids were still in school,” Dalot said.

Another domestic worker named Michelle Obedencio, 34, said she too had suffered abuse from her employers, but even so, she would return to Kuwait if there were no job available for her in the Philippines.

“My husband has no job, so I really must make an effort to go out of the Philippines, if not in Kuwait, someplace else. I have three kids in school, the oldest in college,” Obedencio said.

Loreza Tagle, 37, said she was overworked and underfed by her employer. She quit that job and worked illegally in a restaurant for five years in order to provide for her family.

“It is frightening to come back to the Philippines with no guarantee of finding a job,” Tagle said.

“In Kuwait, no matter what, even if you are in fear of getting caught by the police, somehow you can find a job. But here in the Philippines, you may not be afraid but you won’t have a job,” she said.

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