Hong Kong Police Force Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The Hong Kong Police Force is purportedly “highly concerned” about a report published by an Indonesian think-tank on Wednesday that said at least 43 Indonesian domestic workers in Hong Kong had been linked to ISIS.

Only a small number of Indonesian maids linked with the Islamist organization are still living in the city after police identified all of them over the past two months, several Hong Kong newspapers reported on Friday, citing an unnamed police source.

According to the report issued by the Jakarta-based Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC) on Wednesday, at least 43 Indonesian domestic workers in Hong Kong had been lured by ISIS recruiters and radicalized.

The police had known about the content of the IPAC report two months ago and started gathering information, Sing Pao reported.

With information provided by overseas agencies and anti-terrorist institutions, the anti-terrorist unit of the police had identified the suspected targets early this month and sent community relations police officers to visit the places where they were serving in order to know them better.

They found that only “a very small number” of these targets were still in the city, while most had returned to Indonesia or tried to relocate to Syria.

The police source did not disclose the exact number still in Hong Kong but said “there are not many”.

The maids in question were devout Muslims who had shown sympathy for ISIS but had not shown any signs of wanting to trigger violent attacks, a police source was quoted as saying in a Ming Pao report.

Officers will keep in regular touch with these maids as well as the Islamic associations they are involved with.

A police spokesman emphasized that there was no specific intelligence suggesting Hong Kong could become the target of a terrorist attack.

Read: Report says 43 Indonesian maids in HK linked with ISIS

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